A new face, a new website. We’ve moved!

The Center for Digital Archaeology has moved to a fresh, new website as of April, 2017! Please visit us at digitalarch.org! This website will be maintained as a blog at digitalarchaeologyblog.org until we have all our posts moved to the new domain.

Prehistoric Art – Part 1

Prehistoric Art – Part 1

Prehistoric Art, a UC Berkeley course by Professor Tim Gill, examines prehistoric imagery and objects of “art” and addresses the question: can our modern mind grasp their real meaning?

Virtual Heritage and Engaged Audiences: a Challenging Relationship

Virtual Heritage and Engaged Audiences: a Challenging Relationship

In her presentation “Prowess-ing the Past: Considering the Audience”, Ruth Tringham gives a thorough analysis of state of the art, best practices, and successful (or not) case studies, and shares a new audience-centric point of view. Above all, she shifts the focus from 3D modeling in archaeology and cultural heritage to consider the ways in which a more active motivation and engagement of users (whether professionals or general public) might also lead to the long-term sustainability of the models and visualizations.

Using storytelling to build a compelling digital exhibit

Using storytelling to build a compelling digital exhibit

There is something to be said about big data and the information we can gather about human behavior from the analysis of views and likes on web 2.0 sites, but trying to make sense of huge masses of data on the human scale can be quite an undertaking. The internet is a great place to share stories and archive knowledge, but curation and storytelling via a small collection of data can create an intimate experience in a sea of voices.

Media Processing: Folder Management = Better Workflow

Media Processing: Folder Management = Better Workflow

This simple folder structure is set up at the beginning of all projects we work on and it helps us to define our media processing workflow in order to produce results that meet the needs of clients and funding institutions for sustainable, archival, and accessible data.

In defense of nonprofit business tactics to preserve cultures – Part 2

In defense of nonprofit business tactics to preserve cultures – Part 2

We left off last week with me feeling reassured that I could show up to work each day and act like some sort of Product Manager and Business-Guy All-Arounder… In this Part 2 of my post, I describe 6 product management principles that I have adopted and adapted to help CoDA’s mission of preserving cultures digitally.

In defense of nonprofit business tactics to preserve cultures – Part 1

In defense of nonprofit business tactics to preserve cultures – Part 1

My first work after Product Manager School was five months of consulting at a nonprofit. I quickly learned that the differences between nonprofit and for-profit companies don’t really impact the development of the products and services themselves. Soon after meeting the CoDA team, I knew that the skills I’d been developing in school could be put to good use in this unexpected new setting.

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